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Naivasha, Kenya, 25 September 2015– UN-Habitat through the Support to the Sustainable Urban Development Sector in Kenya Project (2012-2015) is supporting Urban Planning schools in Kenya to improve the quality of planning education. The support to planning schools is premised on the fact that Africa is the fastest growing continent and projections indicate that up to 60% of Africa will be urban by 2050 thereby creating the need to equip and prepare planning graduates with adequate knowledge and skills to be able to meet emerging and future challenges of urbanization.

Wed, 2015-09-30 11:51

The construction of Thika Superhighway began in 2009 and was completed in 2012, a period which saw the rush for ‘prime’ land along the project. With sprawl inevitable, the need for housing was imminent, and with housing comes the need for service centres to offer consumable goods, recreation, and other necessities, thus developers took the opportunity. Large malls; mixed use developments incorporating wholesale and retail enterprises, office spaces, residential houses, leisure/recreational spots and banks, have since been put up, generally transforming the character of Thika road environs. So far, since the completion of the superhighway, Thika Road Mall, Garden City, Mountain Mall, Juja City Mall, and Uni-City Mall in Kenyatta University have all been put up, or are under construction.

Mon, 2015-08-03 14:13

The Centre for Urban Research and Innovations in collaboration with the Association of African Planning Schools (AAPS), conducted a study on ‘infrastructure knowledge programme policy research’ themed Urban infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa – harnessing land values, housing and transport’.

Mon, 2015-08-03 13:09

A Regional Learning Workshop on “Land and Natural Resources Tenure Security” took place in in Nairobi-Kenya on 30th June to 2nd July 2015 to provide an important opportunity for the different IFAD-supported projects and partners in East and Southern Africa to share their achievements, lessons learnt and provide a way forward.

Thu, 2015-07-30 15:22


From our Blog

The Country is currently engaged in deliberations for undertaking a huge construction project that will have far-reaching impact on many aspects of the social, spatial, economic, environmental, and political consequences both now and in future. As we read about cost issues as well as the operational and political repercussions of the same, and what this project has to do to serve the economy, Planners have to ask and confront some fundamental questions:

The long history of cities has it that they have been centres of prosperity and social integration. From the pre historic, all through history to the modern times, cities have continued to exist playing critical roles in human development. Cities have been known to be the centres of urbanism formed by numerous interwoven elements.

In recent years Nairobi has seen the massive growth of mammoth high-rise developments in the name of apartments. They have attracted some research by Marie Hzermeyer and Baraka Mwau among others. They come up in many shades - but typically they are dense and feature small rooms. From one perspective they are viewed as the answer to the housing shortage and alternative to slums. On the other hand they are seen as accidents waiting to happen. Many of them have poor infrastructure and are poorly designed. Their social impact is least studied.

A common planning trend with old, contemporary and growing urban areas across the world is the setting out of the green spaces. The green spaces or ‘open spaces’ as are commonly referred play a big role in maintaining the social, cultural/ heritage and political value in the urban spaces.